Tangible, visible commitment

For the third year the partnership between GSK and Save the Children has been voted “the most admired” by FTSE corporate and UK charity professionals.

GSK already invests 20% of profits from developing regions into healthcare access, but this partnership brings something different – in particular the depth of organisational involvement.

The partnership involves R&D expertise and the collective effort required to bring an innovation to market. For example, GSK has reformulated Chlorhexidine, an antiseptic ingredient used in mouthwash, into a gel to help prevent umbilical cord infections – a major cause of new born deaths.

The organisational effort and tangible product outcome support a positive picture of the GSK culture and commitment. There is substance in this partnership and GSK offers inspiration to those brands seeking more than a superficial social impact.

Here’s more information on GSK alongside four other brands that should be highly commended for turning social purpose into a tangible innovation.

1.  GSK and Save the Children

2.  Savlon Healthy Hands Chalk Sticks

Savlon took a tangible step in improving child hand hygiene in India by creating chalk sticks infused with soap. Partnering with India’s biggest school meals distributor the hand hygiene sticks have been introduced into 22 Indian cities, reaching 1.5 million children daily.  It is also a brilliant example of a brand working with behavioural insight.

3.  Coca-Cola Ecocenters Initiative

ekocenter

Coca-Cola’s Ekocenter is a purposeful ‘physical availability’ innovation delivered with a number of partners such as IBM and Ericsson.  Each Ekocenter is a modular community market that is run by a local female entrepreneur and provides safe water, solar power, internet access and coca-cola. There are now more than 150 Ekocenters  mainly in Kenya, Tanzania, Rwanda, Ethiopia, Ghana and Vietnam.

4.  UNICEF Kid Power Bands

poster-p-1-social-good-unicef-kid-power-y7g3le

Developed by the charity UNICEF itself the Kid Power Band project probably shouldn’t make my list.  But this tangible innovation must provide inspiration for companies seeking to apply technology for social good.  The fitness bands sold via sponsoring retailers raise money and help children to be both active and to learn about new cultures.  Children earn points for completing activities and missions. These points and missions unlock lifesaving therapeutic food packets for kids in need around the world.

5.  Nudie Jeans Repair Shops

Nudie-Berwick-Street

Nudie Jeans is committed to reducing the environmental impact of their jeans. In addition to sourcing Fairtrade organic cotton Nudie offers an in-store repair service for all their jeans and DIY repair kits available by post.  The repairing shops and kits create a distinctive focal point for the brand and a vehicle for extending the life of their jeans and reducing landfill.

 

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